UPDATE SUNYADK / November 2019

The SUNY Adirondack monthly newsletter


PROGRAM SPOTLIGHTS

 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE: POLICE SCIENCE

MEET OUR ALUMNI

SUNY Adirondack alumnus Shane Crooks is the new Saratoga Springs Chief of Police.

SUNY Adirondack alumnus Shane Crooks is the new Saratoga Springs Chief of Police.

SUNY Adirondack alumnus named Chief of Police

After serving 15 years with the Saratoga Springs Police Department, Shane Crooks was appointed Chief of Police in September.

Crooks, a 1998 SUNY Adirondack graduate in Criminal Justice, looks forward to serving the city in this leadership role.

“I want to focus on expanding our community outreach programs while continuing to provide professional services to the community we serve,” Crooks said. “As Chief of Police of the Saratoga Springs Police Department, I plan to perform my duties with honor, integrity and respect — and I expect the same from my officers.”

Crooks, who lives in Corinth, attended SUNY Adirondack because he needed to work after graduating high school, and the college made it possible for him to pursue a degree while maintaining a full-time job. After earning his associate degree, he was able to transfer to Empire State College to earn a bachelor’s degree.

“SUNY Adirondack provided me with a foundation from which I could use to help myself prepare for a career. I was able to take away things that allowed me to improve my civil service test scores, increasing my chances of obtaining employment. I was also able to use what I learned directly in my field, from forensics to police supervision. I still use what I learned at SUNY Adirondack today,” he said.

Crooks recommends the college to people interested in working in law enforcement.

“My agency and many others require a certain amount of college credits to be eligible for employment. I would recommend SUNY Adirondack to them based upon my own experiences,” Crooks said. “SUNY Adirondack can help prepare them for their law enforcement careers, as it did for me. The professors there were fantastic. They took the time out of their schedules to answer any questions, not just related to the class they were teaching but the field in general.”

 

Joy Savoie is a senior crime victim specialist with the Warren County District Attorney’s Office.
Joy Savoie is a senior crime victim specialist with the Warren County District Attorney’s Office.

Graduate helps crime victims

Joy Savoie learned first-hand how college internships can have a lasting effect on students.

When Savoie was a Criminal Justice major at SUNY Adirondack, she applied for an internship with the Warren County District Attorney’s Office. Savoie got the position and interned for about a year, which led to a part-time position as a crime victim specialist. 

“The internship program allows students to go out and experience different career paths in criminal justice. When I started doing this job as an intern, it really sparked an interest in me. I realized it was what I really wanted to do,” said Savoie, a Corinth native who lives in Queensbury.

She continued working with the office after graduation while she finished her bachelor’s degree at SUNY Plattsburgh in Queensbury. Now a senior crime victim specialist, Savoie has worked for the district attorney’s office for more than 13 years.

“It’s a rewarding job being able to help people get through some of the most tragic times in their lives. Being a victim is nothing anyone plans for. I help them get through the court process and tell them what they can expect,” she said. “In the end, the rewarding part is to see them grow from the experience and become stronger.”

 

MEET OUR STUDENTS

Casey Cogdill is an intern at the Warren County District Attorney’s Office working with the crime victim specialists.

Casey Cogdill is an intern at the Warren County District Attorney’s Office working with the crime victim specialists.

“The ability to have professors who want to see you be serious about what you’re doing and the career you’re about to take on has been a pleasure because I have been able to be more mature and realistic about ‘the next step.’ Professor Carpenter recognized my hard work and selected me for an internship at the Warren County District Attorney’s Office working with the crime victim specialists. I have been interning there since Fall 2018, gaining experience and knowledge in all aspects of the criminal justice system. SUNY Adirondack was not only a great decision for my education, but it also provided me with experiences I did not expect to receive — and I am extremely thankful for all of them.” — Casey Cogdill, Criminal Justice: Police Science major, Queensbury

 

MEET OUR FACULTY

Professor of Criminal Justice Michael Carpenter encourages students to take part in internships as part of the college learning experience.

Professor of Criminal Justice Michael Carpenter encourages students to take part in internships as part of the college learning experience.

"The Criminal Justice: Police Science degree provides students with a high-quality education as they prepare for a wide variety of exciting careers in the field of criminal justice. The challenges they face in providing valuable and critical services to the citizens in our communities will best be met by ensuring they have a meaningful and rigorous academic background. Taught by present or former criminal justice practitioners, our Criminal Justice: Police Science degree does provide this background to our students as they face the prospects of a challenging and rewarding career in the field of criminal justice."  — Michael Carpenter, professor of Criminal Justice

 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE: SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES

MEET OUR FACULTY

Bryan Flowers, an adjunct professor in social sciences, is licensed in New York state as a Mental Health Counselor and as a Credentialed Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counselor.

Bryan Flowers, an adjunct professor in social sciences, is licensed in New York state as a Mental Health Counselor and as a Credentialed Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counselor.

Professor prepares students for real-world experience

Helping someone recover from addiction requires more than just book learning.

As an adjunct psychology instructor, Bryan Flowers works with students in SUNY Adirondack’s Substance Abuse Services program to think beyond the textbook.

“It helps for people to practice the skills they are learning. They need to learn how to build rapport. My job is to help people turn the information they learn into practice so when someone is sitting in front of them, they will know what to say to open up a conversation,” said Flowers.

Flowers is licensed in New York state as a Mental Health Counselor and as a Credentialed Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counselor. He also holds certification nationally as a Certified Counselor and as a Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor.

“The college’s program is intensive. There’s quite a bit of information that they have to learn,” Flowers said.

Flowers encourages his students to think beyond the addiction.

“Substance abuse isn’t necessarily the core issue. It’s one of the symptoms. We need to become aware of trauma and provide support. People are often self medicating,” he said.

The program prepares students to qualify as a CASAC-T (certified alcohol substance abuse counselor-trainee) and to sit for the CASAC examination offered by the state’s Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Service.

“Students are getting jobs right out of a two-year degree. It’s a good time for the program. There are a lot of opportunities in the area. Graduates will be able to get hired,” Flowers said. “One of the best things about the curriculum is that it sets students up for a nice competitive edge.”

 

DID YOU KNOW?
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the job outlook for substance abuse counselors is expected to grow 23 percent through the next decade, much faster than the average for all occupations.

 

MEET OUR STUDENTS

Lyn Stadler is pursuing a second career through SUNY Adirondack’s Criminal Justice: Substance Abuse Services program.

Lyn Stadler is pursuing a second career through SUNY Adirondack’s Criminal Justice: Substance Abuse Services program.

Student prepares for career helping others

Lyn Stadler wants to provide hope for people suffering with addictions.

“I almost died from my addiction and would not be alive today were it not for the professionals in the field of addiction and recovery,” said Stadler, who lives in Argyle. “The people I encountered during my recovery and completion of an intensive outpatient program were not only educated and professional, many of them were also recovering addicts who had survived their own addictions.”

She already has a bachelor’s degree in recombinant gene technology, but Stadler enrolled in SUNY Adirondack’s Criminal Justice: Substance Abuse Services degree program because she wanted to change careers so she could support others who are struggling to overcome addiction. Her career goal is to work full time as a Credentialed Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Counselor (CASAC).

“My experiences at SUNY Adirondack have been incredible. I am amazed on a daily basis by how all-encompassing the program and the services on campus are. The classes are providing knowledge, of course, but the real-life experiences the instructors bring to the classroom are more valuable than any textbook.  Knowledge is power, but experience, especially in human services, is far more helpful in terms of being ready to perform in the field,” she said.

 

Edward Ryan is a Criminal Justice: Substance Abuse major at SUNY Adirondack.

Edward Ryan is a Criminal Justice: Substance Abuse major at SUNY Adirondack.

“I am currently doing an internship with an outpatient substance abuse clinic as a part of my education. I have enjoyed the atmosphere of SUNY Adirondack and have found it to be helpful, encouraging and professional.” — Edward Ryan, Criminal Justice: Substance Abuse Services major, South Glens Falls

 

ACCOUNTING

Assistant Professor of Business Heidi Durkee sees a bright future for SUNY Adirondack Accounting majors.

Assistant Professor of Business Heidi Durkee sees a bright future for SUNY Adirondack Accounting majors.

Program adjusts to industry demands

SUNY Adirondack’s Business division recently modified the college’s Accounting degree to an associate of science to better meet the needs of its students and the business community.

“This program is designed to improve the preparation of our students who are transferring to bachelor’s programs in accounting, while also providing them with certain ‘micro-credentials,’ such as a knowledge of QuickBooks, which will help them find employment before completing their B.S. in Accounting,” said Heidi Durkee, assistant professor of Business.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of accountants and auditors is projected to grow 10 percent through 2026, faster than the average for all occupations.

"The College's Accounting degree is important to the region in that it gives our area students a solid baseline of foundational knowledge in generally accepted accounting practices and principles that can be utilized by them in starting their own businesses or assisting existing businesses as employees," said John Arpey, associate professor of Business. "It also provides our region with a base of students who may also pursue more advanced degrees in accounting and related fields. Many of them will stay in our area or return to our area upon completion of their education and provide a level of expertise in this important field of business management and planning."

Whitney Richardson, a 2019 graduate of SUNY Plattsburgh’s bachelor’s degree program, felt SUNY Adirondack prepared her well for the next step in her education.

“I graduated with a double major in Business Administration and Accounting as well as minors in Finance and Supply Chain Management. I will also have 150 credits in anticipation that I will be completing the CPA exam,” Richardson said. “After graduation, I started a job in Clifton Park with LeverPoint Management firm as staff accountant, and I will be sponsored by them to take the CPA exam.”

Durkee enjoys hearing about her former students’ accomplishments.

“The most rewarding part of teaching our Accounting students is to work with them here at SUNY Adirondack and then see them pursue their bachelor's or master's degree and become employed by a local business or a larger accounting firm. It is rewarding to know that you played a role in their journey,” Durkee said.

Did you know?
SUNY Adirondack graduates can transfer seamlessly to top accredited business schools, including Siena College, SUNY Albany and SUNY Plattsburgh.

MEET OUR ALUMNI

Kevin Hayes was recently appointed dot the SUNY Adirondack Board of Trustees.

Kevin Hayes was recently appointed to the SUNY Adirondack Board of Trustees.

Accounting degree leads to leadership role

Kevin Hayes has applied the lessons he learned at SUNY Adirondack to a lifetime of public service.

A native of Argyle, Hayes came to the college in the 1970s and soon found career inspiration from the faculty.

“I went to school to be a bookkeeper, but Professor Nick Buttino suggested that I might really want to be an accountant. He raised my level of knowledge quite a bit,” Hayes said.

After graduation, he transferred to Siena College, where he earned a bachelor’s in Business Administration.

Hayes worked as a senior accountant for Jenkins and Powers CPA before becoming the first administrator of Washington County, a position he held for 31 years until his retirement in 2015.

“I’m really committed to SUNY Adirondack,” said Hayes, who was recently appointed to the college’s Board of Trustees by Washington County. “I wouldn’t have had the career I had without it. The school literally put me in the right direction. I really believe in the importance of a community college education.”

 

CREATIVE WRITING

MEET OUR ALUMNI

Dustin LaValley is the author of ‘BEETLES.’

Dustin LaValley is the author of ‘BEETLES.’

Graduate’s writing is more than an ‘Escape’

Dustin LaValley is the author of his own destiny.

A 2009 SUNY Adirondack graduate, LaValley has been an accomplished screenwriter, author and comic book creator for more than a decade.

“I was selling screenplays, books, comic books, consulting for televisions and editing for independent publishers before my two-year degree was complete,” LaValley said.

A native of Plattsburgh, he has worked as a writer for Showtime’s “Ray Donovan” and “Escape at Dannemora,” and his screenplays have received numerous awards, including Best Drama at the 2018 West Coast Film Festival and an IMDb Independent Short Films Award in 2014.

LaValley credits Professor Emeritus Paul Gallipeo with helping him unlock his talent and find his voice as a writer.

“Dr. Gallipeo noticed my enthusiasm for written assignments and urged me to pursue creative writing exercises that would turn into my first professional sales,” said LaValley, who lives in the southern Adirondacks.

LaValley recently published the hardcover comic “BEETLES!” in the United Kingdom. The story is an homage to the 1950s big-bug and atomic test films, according to the author.

“Much of what Dr. Gallipeo taught me about writing atmosphere is what made this comic script stand out to the publisher and snagged me a contract,” he said.

 

Carmel Harwood credits the SUNY Adirondack Creative Writing program with helping her develop realistic career objectives.

Carmel Harwood credits the SUNY Adirondack Creative Writing program with helping her develop realistic career objectives.

Young writer balances career, creativity

Carmel Harwood is a human resources professional by day and a writer by night.

Harwood, who graduated in May from SUNY Adirondack with a degree in Creative Writing, lives in Tennessee and works in Georgia as a recruiter for Hanwha Q-Cells, the largest solar manufacturing facility in the Western Hemisphere.

“The SUNY Adirondack Creative Writing program gave me a very realistic look at what it means and takes to be a successful writer. It is not the norm for writers to be instantly successful. It takes consistent work, networking connections and perseverance to achieve publication,” said Harwood.

Although Harwood has dreams of becoming a published author, she also enjoys her day job.

“I would like to establish a steady working career, quite possibly in human resources, that would allow me to write regularly and publish my creative works,” she said.

She credits the faculty at SUNY Adirondack with giving her the foundation she needs to be successful.

“My professors were able to instill both optimism and realism in their lessons, which I truly appreciate,” she said.

 

MEET OUR FACULTY

Distinguished Professor of English Lale Davidson works with students on a writing assignment.

Distinguished Professor of English Lale Davidson works with students on a writing assignment.

"We are one of the few community college Creative Writing programs with a visiting author program integrated into the degree program. Every year we have a few startlingly talented student writers — usually autodidacts — who inspire the entire class to engage in creative thinking more seriously and yet more playfully at the same time." — Lale Davidson, distinguished professor of English

 

CENTER FOR READING AND WRITING

The Center for Reading and Writing is located in the library in the Scoville Learning Center.

The Center for Reading and Writing is located in the library in the Scoville Learning Center.

Demand for tutoring center continues to grow

In the age of emojis and text messaging, SUNY Adirondack’s Center for Reading and Writing is helping students find their words.

The language lab, located on the main floor of the library in the Scoville Learning Center and at the SUNY Adirondack Saratoga Tutoring Center, gives students the opportunity to work with tutors at any stage of their reading or writing project – from understanding an assignment and brainstorming ideas to proofreading the final draft of a written paper.

The center, which is also open to faculty and staff, has become a popular resource, according to Khristeena Lute, assistant professor of English and CRW director.

“We’ve gone up in foot traffic about 30 percent just since the Spring semester,” Lute said.

The facility, which promotes the skills needed for college-level learning, is so well utilized that Lute suggests students make an appointment to assure they get the help they need.

“The CRW is essential to students because it provides another space and environment in which to learn, in addition to the classroom,” she said. “As writers, we all benefit from different perspectives, and the CRW’s tutors can help meet that need — whether it’s a creative piece or a an academic paper. We greatly enjoy the one-on-one sessions with our clients and seeing them grow into their roles as academics and writers. “

 

MEET OUR FACULTY

Stephanie Drotos is assistant professor of English and a reading specialist at SUNY Adirondack.

Stephanie Drotos is assistant professor of English and a reading specialist at SUNY Adirondack.

“I love working with students to help them acclimate to college and learn what it means to be engaged in academic discourse. It’s nice to help others avoid the pitfalls that I didn’t know about as a first-generation college student.” — Stephanie Drotos, assistant professor of English and reading specialist

 


IN THE NEWS

SUNY Adirondack student Ricardo Blair created artwork featured in a poster and T-shirts for Black Solidarity Day.

SUNY Adirondack student Ricardo Blair created artwork featured in a poster and T-shirts for Black Solidarity Day.

College examines history, politics on Black Solidarity Day

SUNY Adirondack will mark Black Solidarity Day on Nov. 4 with a public viewing of the True Black History Museum and a lecture on the significance of the annual event.

The True Black History Museum will be open for public viewing from 12:45 to 5:30 p.m. in the Northwest Bay Conference Center on the Queensbury Campus. The traveling museum features more than 150 artifacts and original documents from historic figures, including Martin Luther King Jr., Mary McLeod Bethune, Booker T. Washington, Rosa Parks, George Washington Carver, Angela Davis, President Barack Obama and many other noted African Americans.  

Fred Saffold, curator of the museum, will present a lecture at 12:45 p.m. on the origins of Black Solidarity Day and its current relevance. 

SUNY Adirondack student Ricardo Blair, a Fine Arts major from Brooklyn, created artwork that is featured on official T-shirts and posters for the occasion.

“Art is a story for me, and it has always been a tool for me to get out the message of Black pride and Black liberation,” said Blair, who is part of the college’s Educational Opportunity Program (EOP). “I want to shine a light on things that people from my community don’t normally see. I use the stereotypical imagery of Black men and take ownership of it, like when rappers flipped the usage of racist language.”

Black Solidarity Day was created in 1969 by Panamanian-born activist, historian and playwright Carlos E. Russell, who was inspired by the fictional play “Day of Absence” by Douglas Turner Ward. The event is observed annually before an Election Day in November.

The SUNY Adirondack Black Solidarity Day programming, which is free and open to the public, is sponsored by the SUNY Adirondack Senate, SUNY Adirondack College Activity Board, FSA of SUNY Adirondack, Resident Hall Association, Anthropology Club and Student Engagement and Diversity Office.

 

Assistant Professor of English Donna Hayles assists a student with a class assignment.

Assistant Professor of English Donna Hayles assists a student with a class assignment.

Federal grant awarded to SUNY Adirondack

State University of New York Chancellor Kristina M. Johnson announced on Oct. 3 that the U.S. Department of Education has awarded SUNY Adirondack with a $2.25 million grant.

The funding will be used to assess and bolster the first-year experience for incoming students, expand academic support services and enhance technology.

“Through SUNY Achieve, we have prioritized expanding support services across our university system, particularly for first-year students,” said Johnson. “This federal grant will help SUNY Adirondack provide access to a more robust set of academic support resources that will ensure our students can succeed.”  

The Title III Strengthening Institutions Program support grant will be administered at $450,000 per year over five years. With the funding, SUNY Adirondack plans to add additional student success coaches to guide students throughout their first year, increase math remediation efforts and implement technology enhancements to build higher student engagement. These efforts align with SUNY Achieve, a system-wide initiative to expand intensive, evidence-based supports that help students complete gateway courses in their first year.

 “We are grateful for the necessary resources to increase the success rates of our students,” said SUNY Adirondack President Kristine Duffy. “To create equitable outcomes for all, additional investments are required in order for us to provide intentional services and advanced technology. SUNY Adirondack will make good use of this Department of Education investment to support our students.”

Strengthening Institutions Program grants are awarded to help higher education institutions become self-sufficient and expand their capacity to serve low-income students. The grants provide funds to improve and strengthen an institution's academic quality, institutional management and fiscal stability. Funds may be used for planning, faculty development, establishing endowment funds, administrative management and the development and improvement of academic programs. Other projects include the joint use of instructional facilities, construction, maintenance and student-service programs designed to improve academic success.

 

The exhibit ‘Field of Vision’ includes work from artists Lisa Barthelson, top, Megan Hinton, bottom left, and Erin Whitman.

The exhibit ‘Field of Vision’ includes work from artists Lisa Barthelson, top, Megan Hinton, bottom left, and Erin Whitman.

Group show offers ‘Vision’

SUNY Adirondack will hold an opening reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Nov. 13 for the group show “Field of Vision: Megan Hinton, Lisa Barthelson, Erin Whitman” in the Visual Arts Gallery in Dearlove Hall.

The show, which runs Nov. 13 through Feb. 6, features the work of three women who delve into themes of femininity, environmental concerns and social issues.

Megan Hinton’s oil paintings present social issues that speak to our current responses of “polarization, conformity and uprising,” using bold swathes of color. The mixed media and sculptures of Lisa Barthelson are often responsive to motherhood and objects of consumerism. Erin Whitman's paintings reveal the landscape around the southern border and the wall that is always present in her life.

The Visual Arts Gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Thursday, with extended hours from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday.  All Visual Arts Gallery programming is free and open to the public.

 

Volunteers assemble comfort kits for domestic violence victims during a SUNY’s Got Your Back event in the Student Center.

Volunteers assemble comfort kits for domestic violence victims during a SUNY’s Got Your Back event in the Student Center.

SUNY Adirondack community assists victims of violence

SUNY Adirondack marked Domestic Violence Awareness Month with a SUNY’s Got Your Back support event on Oct. 15 in the Student Center on the Queensbury campus.

Students, faculty and staff volunteers assembled 1,500 comfort kits for victims of violence. The kits contain toiletries and informational pamphlets about local shelters and available hospital support services.

SUNY’s Got Your Back is an initiative for college students, faculty, staff and community members from across the state to assist victims and survivors of violence and to learn methods of better prevention and response to violence. More than 15 SUNY campuses participated in Spring 2019, and more than 20 campuses are scheduled to volunteer during the Fall semester.

Sponsors included the Adirondack Branch of AAUW Club (American Association of University Women), SUNY Adirondack Student Senate and the Faculty Student Association of SUNY Adirondack.

For more information on SUNY’s Got Your Back, go to www.suny.edu/gotyourback.

 

SUNY Adiorndack students used AllSeated software to map out the Northwest Bay Conference Center on campus.

SUNY Adirondack students used AllSeated software to map out the Northwest Bay Conference Center on campus.

Class tackles event planning with virtual reality

Business students are using certification gained in the classroom to help plan a major campus event.

Nine students in the Conventions, Meetings and Exposition Management course recently passed the AllSeated certification.

The certification, which is held over the course of the first half of the semester, provides students and their prospective employers with the latest technological, time-saving and overall efficient use of money to plan events. Using new technology, students learn event-planning skills, including how to create floor plans, layouts, table settings, menus, guest lists, reservations and inventories. 

The AllSeated software offers three viewing abilities, including standard 2-D, 3-D and Virtual Reality. With the use of special glasses, an event planner can “virtually walk” through a floor plan without having to leave the office.

The students will be using the certification as they plan and execute the Made@ADK event on Nov. 19 in the Northwest Bay Conference Center in Adirondack Hall. In addition to having completed the floor layouts using the dimensions for Northwest Bay and uploading them into AllSeated , the students will also be using the softwares app feature to check in both vendors and VIPs from tablets on the day of the event.

 


THINGS TO DO

Musician Ryan Leddick performs Nov. 6 in the Visual Arts Gallery.

Musician Ryan Leddick performs Nov. 6 in the Visual Arts Gallery.

  • Singer-songwriter Ryan Leddick will perform a live concert at 12:45 p.m. Nov. 6 in the Visual Arts Gallery in Dearlove Hall as part of the SUNY Adirondack Pamela Firth Music at Midday series. An Adirondack Park native, Leddick blends R&B, reggae and acoustic rock to create a signature sound. A veteran performer, he has shared the stage with musicians Damien Rice, Patty Larkin and notable Broadway artists. The program is free and open to the public.
  • SUNY Adirondack’s International Education program will offer an information session on the college’s upcoming trip to Denmark and Norway at 12:45 p.m. Nov. 6 in Eisenhart Hall, Room 208.
  • Liz Sutton, social media manager for Mannix Marketing, will discuss how business profiles on social media provide data analytics at 7:30 a.m. Nov 7 in the Center for Entrepreneurship in Adirondack Hall as part of the college’s Social Media Series. Registration is $15 for community members and free for those with a sunyacc.edu email address. For more information, email businesscentral@sunyacc.edu.
  • SUNY Adirondack will hold an opening reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Nov. 13 for the group show “Field of Vision: Megan Hinton, Lisa Barthelson, Erin Whitman” in the Visual Arts Gallery in Dearlove Hall.
  • Graphic novelists Wendy and Tyler Chin-Tanner, creators of “American Terrorist,” will discuss the comic form and the challenges of collaboration at 12:30 p.m. Nov. 13 in the Visual Arts Gallery in Dearlove Hall as part of the Writers Project series. Wendy Chin-Tanner will also read selections from her recent poetry collection “Anyone Will Tell You” and reflect on the themes that run through all of her work. Theo program is free and open to the public.
  • The SUNY Adirondack theatre group will perform the play "Waiting for Lefty" by Clifford Odets at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 14,15 and 16 and 2:30 p.m. Nov. 17 in the SUNY Adirondack Theatre. The classic play, first produced in 1935, consists of a series of related vignettes framed around a meeting of cab drivers who are planning a labor strike. For more information, call 518.743.2200, ext. 2475.
  • Wendy Johnston, associate professor of Political Science, will conduct a talk on the historical significance of the play "Waiting for Lefty,” which is being performed on campus, at 6 p.m. Nov. 14 in the Visual Arts Gallery in Dearlove Hall.
  • Dr. John Jablonski, vice president for Academic Affairs, will present “Rural Community Colleges and Quality of Life in their Vicinity: A Longitudinal Study, 1960-2010” at 12:40 p.m. Nov. 18 in Miller Auditorium in Dearlove Hall. The College Lecture Series program is free and open to the public.
  • Celebrate National Entrepreneurship Day at SUNY Adirondack with a showcase of  local entrepreneurs at the Made at ADK! event from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 19 in the Northwest Bay Conference Center in Adirondack Hall. SUNY Adirondack President Kristine Duffy will speak at 10 a.m., and Buck Bryan will present the keynote address at 1 p.m. To register or to learn more about the event, contact Brandon Aldous at aldousb@sunyacc.edu.
  • The college will mark Transgender Day of Remembrance with a candlelight vigil at 1 p.m. Nov. 20 in Miller Auditorium in Dearlove Hall.
  • Teah Teriele of Death Wish Coffee will talk about the value of social media for small businesses at 7:30 a.m. Nov. 21 at SUNY Adirondack Saratoga as part of the college’s Social Media Series. Registration is $15 for community members and free for those with a sunyacc.edu email address. Registration is available online. For more information, email businesscentral@sunyacc.edu.
  • Professor of Studio Art John Hampshire will join fellow artists featured in the “Artists of the Mohawk Hudson Region” exhibit for an “Artside Chat” at 11:30 a.m. Nov. 21 at The Hyde Collection, 162 Warren St. in Glens Falls. Hampshire will talk about what inspires him and his life as an artist.
  • SUNY Adirondack will present a Rock Band Showcase at 5 p.m. Nov. 22 in the SUNY Adirondack Theatre. The concert will showcase some of the hottest new talent in the region, including grape juice!, Modern Islands, Frank Palangi, Hasty Page and The Blonde Roots Band.

ACCOLADES

SUNY Adirondack recently participated in the Glens Falls Branch of the NAACP’s annual Soul Food Dinner.

SUNY Adirondack recently participated in the Glens Falls Branch of the NAACP’s annual Soul Food Dinner.

  • Barbara Cockfield, director of Student Engagement and Diversity, and five SUNY Adirondack students attended the Glens Falls Branch of the NAACP’s annual Soul Food Dinner on Oct. 26. The event marked a renewed relationship between the college and the local civic group, which has a rich history of addressing equality and diversity in upstate New York.
  • Erin Krivitski, assistant director for Workforce Training, will be honored by the Continuing Education Association of New York (CEANY) at its annual meeting in White Plains, New York, next month. Erin is one of two recipients of the New Outstanding Continuing Education Professional Award. CEANY members are from SUNY, CUNY and private colleges and universities throughout New York State.
  • The Extended Programs Division of Academic Affairs recently added two staff members. Ryan Cummings is the new Early College Career Academy and PTECH student success advisor. Cummings holds an MBA from the College of St. Joseph and has most recently worked in the Office for Student Success as a student success aid. He has also held roles as the assistant general manager with the Glens Falls Dragons and program coordinator for the Ballston Area Recreation Commission. He is an assistant baseball coach at SUNY Adirondack. Zachary Perry-LaPoint is the evening college services representative. Perry-LaPoint is an alumnus of SUNY Adirondack and holds a master’s of Fine Arts in Fiction from Southern New Hampshire University. He also is an adjunct professor of English at SUNY Adirondack and works full time as a community engagement coordinator for the Moreau Community Center.
     

ATHLETICS

The SUNY Adirondack volleyball team will play in the NJCAA Region 3 Regional Tournament Nov. 2-3 in Niagara.

The SUNY Adirondack volleyball team will play in the NJCAA Region 3 Regional Tournament Nov. 2-3 in Niagara.

Team headed to regional tournament

The SUNY Adirondack Volleyball team continues to show their strength as they get ready to compete in Regional play. 

The Timberwolves completed their regular season 21-7 and captured the 7th seed in the NJCAA Regional tournament. They are currently on an 11-game winning streak going into post-season play.

The team is led by sophomore co-captains Jana Depalo and Karley Hertzner. They lead the team in kills with 289 (fourth in the Region) and 216 (10th in the Region), respectively. Hertzner has 65 serving aces. Depalo has 49, with first-year Alysia Kane close behind with 48. Freshman setter Raeann Bombard leads the team in assists with 741.

Defensively, Kane leads the team in blocks with 80 (fourth in the Region), along with 70 from Hertzner. Sophomores Megan Fiske and Morgan Bellanger lead the team in digs, with 318 and 314, respectively.

A real team effort goes into the success the team has earned this season, which is an excellent send off for coach Xiao Li after coaching volleyball at SUNY Adirondack for 17 years. Li will be retiring from coaching at the completion of the 2019 season.

The team will play in the NJCAA Region 3 Regional Tournament Nov. 2-3 in Niagara.

 


FOUNDATION

Alumni Drew Schiavi '01-'03, Tim Badger '67-'69 and Jason Carusone '87-'89 were inducted into the SUNY Adirondack Trailblazers Distinguished Alumni Society at a recognition dinner on Oct. 17 at Seasoned.

Alumni Drew Schiavi '01-'03, Tim Badger '67-'69 and Jason Carusone '87-'89 were inducted into the SUNY Adirondack Trailblazers Distinguished Alumni Society at a recognition dinner on Oct. 17 at Seasoned.

 


CULINARY ARTS

SUNY Adirondack’s student-run restaurant, Seasoned, is located at 14 Hudson Ave. in Glens Falls.

SUNY Adirondack’s student-run restaurant, Seasoned, is located at 14 Hudson Ave. in Glens Falls.

Seasoned still accepting dining reservations

Dining services continue at Seasoned, the college’s student-run restaurant in downtown Glens Falls.

The program serves lunch and dinner every Wednesday and Thursday through  Dec. 5, but will be closed closed Nov. 27-29 for the Thanksgiving break. The restaurant is located at 14 Hudson Ave.

Reservations can be made online.

Wednesday lunches offer a three-course meal in a fine-dining setting. The menu features an appetizer, entree and dessert. Lunch includes soda, tea and coffee. The restaurant now has a cash bar featuring beer and wine.

Seatings are available at 11 a.m., 11:15 a.m., noon, 12:15 p.m. and 12:30 p.m. Reservations are preferred. The cost is $15.95, plus tax (cash, check or credit card accepted). Kids 12 and younger are $9.95 plus tax.

Diners can come for a Garde Manger lunch on Thursdays. Culinary students will prepare and serve an a la carte menu of soups, salads and sandwiches. The Casual Dining Room Service class will run the front of the house operation.

Seatings are available at 11 a.m., 11:15 a.m., noon, 12:15 p.m. and 12:30 p.m. Reservations are preferred. Prices are A La Carte. A cash bar is available.

Assorted selection of pastries, cakes, pies, bagels, breads, cookies, candies, compound butters, coffee, tea and JUST Beverages will be available for purchase from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesdays and Thursdays.

Wednesday dinners offer a four-course meal in a fine-dining setting. The menu will consist of an amuse, appetizer, entree and dessert. Dinners include soda, tea and coffee. Chef's Choice Wine or Beer Pairings will be available for each course.

Seatings are available at 5:45 p.m., 6 p.m., 6:15 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 6:45 p.m. and 7 p.m. Reservations are preferred. The cost is $26.95, plus tax (cash, check or credit card accepted).

Thursday dinners are a four-course gourmet meal in a casual dining setting. The menu will feature an appetizer, intermezzo, entree and dessert. Dinner includes soda, tea and coffee. Now offering cash bar featuring beer and wine.

Seatings are available at 5:45 p.m., 6 p.m., 6:15 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 6:45 p.m. and 7 p.m. Reservations are preferred. The cost is $26.95, plus tax (cash, check or credit card accepted). Kids 12 and younger are $18.95, plus tax. 

Like Seasoned on Facebook to view all menus.

Bar drinks and tips cannot be paid on a credit card. Parking is available on Hudson Avenue.

 

Baker Andrea Maranville walks community members through a recipe during a workshop at the Culinary Arts Center in downtown Glens Falls.

Instructor offers ‘Great’ holiday treat

The holidays are just around the corner.

For SUNY Adirondack Culinary Arts Adjunct Professor Andrea Maranville, the season brings back memories of her time spent as a competitor on ABC’s “The Great American Baking Show: Holiday Edition.” 

Maranville, who earned a spot as a series finalist, share her favorite apple pie shortbread bar recipe to help everyone bake for the holidays like champion.

Shortbread Crust (Recipe courtesy Global Bakes By Tanya)

  • 1.5 cups unsalted butter
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1-2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 3.5 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon (optional)
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Apple “Pie” Filling

  • 3-4 apples  (Granny Smith), small diced
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla 
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

Topping

  • 3 ounces chopped pecans (reserved for top, optional)
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1.5 cups flour
  • 10 ounces butter
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon cinnamon

Directions:
First, preheat oven to 350 degrees. Measure out all ingredients. 

Place butter and sugar in a mixer, and mix until combined and incorporated. Add vanilla. Mix till combined. Sift flour, salt and cinnamon. Add to mixer, and mix until just combined. Press into baking pan, and chill for 30 minutes.  

BAKER’S NOTE: USE these 30 minutes to prepare topping and filling. 

Mix topping ingredients and set aside.

Chop apples and place all filling ingredients into a medium-size sauce pot and cook on the stove at low-medium heat until apples are tender and liquid is reduced.  

BAKER’S NOTE: Lightly coat your baking pan with spray and line with parchment paper hanging up past the edge of the pan. This will allow you to remove the entire “bar” from the pan with ease for cutting into squares.  

Remove shortbread pan from the fridge. Lightly poke the shortbread with a fork throughout, and place in the preheated oven for 15 minutes. Under bake the shortbread slightly, as it will bake more once placed back into the oven with topping.

Carefully remove the hot pan from the oven. Place half of the topping mix directly on top of the shortbread base. Next, spread the apple mixture on top of the streusel, and then sprinkle the remaining streusel on top.  

Place back into the oven and bake for approximately 25-30 minutes, or until the top is golden and bubbling.  

Remove from the oven and allow to cool on the counter. Place entire pan into the fridge to cool. Do not attempt to cut the bars until cooled for at lease 2 hours.    

These bars can be stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator, but room temperature is Maranville's suggested serving temperature.

For more recipes, go to www.andreamaranville.com.

 


HUMAN RESOURCES

SUNY Adirondack is accepting applications for the following job openings:

Administrative

Programmer Analyst
Admissions Technology Specialist
Human Resources Administrator

Support Staff

No current listings

Faculty

No current listings

Adjunct

Adjunct Professor of Biology

Para-Professional

No current listings

 

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