Annual Security Report

SUNY ADIRONDACK

ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT
Year 2012

This report is prepared by the Public Safety Office to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. The law mandates that institutions receiving Title IV federal funds disseminate crime statistics for certain serious offenses that occurred on campus and in adjacent areas for the current and previous two calendar years. This report is prepared in cooperation with local law enforcement agencies surrounding our main campus and extension centers, Campus Authorities and Public Safety. The purpose of this report is to provide our current and prospective faculty, staff and students with campus safety information, including crime statistics and procedures to use when reporting a crime. The College will not retaliate or allow any retaliation toward a person(s) who reports alleged violations of this act.

Each year, an e-mail notification is sent to all enrolled student, faculty and staff that provides the web site to access this report. Paper copies of this report may also be obtained in the Facilities office room 007, the Human Resource office room 103 and the Enrollment Management Office room 133 all located in Warren Hall. A copy may also be obtained from the Public Safety Office room 164 of the Residence Life building. All prospective employees may obtain a copy from the Human Resource Office.

General Security & Safety Information

SUNY Adirondack enjoys a full and part-time student population of over 4000 students. The campus employs a workforce of over 350 full and part-time faculty and staff.

The safety of students and college personnel is a top priority on our campus and the College continuously strives to make improvements. Security and safety systems that are in place on the Campus include:

  • Building and room card access systems
  • Security alarms
  • Surveillance systems
  • Peace Officer personnel
  • Emergency telephones in parking lots and building corridors
  • MOU with local Sheriff's Department
  • MOU's with our partner Institutions who share our campus buildings
  • NYAlert Emergency Notification System
  • Fully automatic fire detection systems in all buildings

Fire System Information Specifically for Student Housing

Section 6438 of New York State Education Law requires notification of fire safety standards and measures in all college-owned or college operated housing. To facilitate compliance the following information is provided:

SUNY Adirondack’s Student Housing facility has an automatic sprinkler system of piping and appurtenances designed and installed in accordance with generally accepted standards so that heat from a fire will automatically cause water to be discharged over the fire area to extinguish it or prevent its further spread.

The Student Housing Facility also has a fire safety system which includes automatic fire detection devices (smoke alarms, heat detectors) installed throughout the building and is monitored 24/7 for any activation. Devices that alert one to the presence of a fire such as horns, bells and strobe lights are also installed throughout the building. All systems are installed in accordance with generally accepted practices.

Law Enforcement Authority of Campus Security Personnel

Peace Officers: Typical work of Peace Officer personnel involves enforcing campus policies, regulations and procedures. SUNY Adirondack Peace Officers have the authority to ask persons for identifications and to determine whether individuals have lawful business at the College. SUNY Adirondack Peace Officers enforce the Penal and Traffic Laws of New York State in the Colleges geographical area and have arrest powers. Depending on the nature, incidents may be referred to the law enforcement agency having jurisdiction on campus.

Campus Public Safety Officers conduct foot and vehicle patrols throughout the campus and residence halls  24 hours a day 365 days a year. The office of Public Safety's objective is to provide a safe learning environment and protect the lives and property of students, employees and visitors pusued within the framework of the College's policies, rules and regulations and all local, state and federal laws.

Please be aware that victims and witnesses can report a crime on a voluntary and confidential basis. Reports are filed for informational purposes only for inclusion in the College's annual crime reporting. Official investigations of criminal offenses are conducted by the proper local authorities.

The investigation of crimes committed on College property falls under the jurisdiction of the Public Safety Office. Public Safety works closely with local law enforcement agencies including the Warren County Sheriff and/or the New York State Police to assist with incidents that occur on or off campus and involve College students or employees. If Public Safety determines that a serious crime or felony has been committed, Public Safety will refer the case to the appropriate local law enforcement agency and assist in its investigation.

If an incident occurs that the College feels may have an affect on the safety and well being of the College community, information concerning the incident will be communicated by one or more of the following communication channels: NY-Alert, paper flyer, student/staff e-mail, bulletin boards and the College's web-site. Students, Faculty and staff are encouraged to sign up for NY-Alert in Banner self-serv.

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)

The College and the Warren County Sheriff's Department have an MOU which recognizes the Department has primary law enforcement jurisdiction on all Warren County property owned, leased or under the control of the college and will provide police services on said property. A copy of this MOU is available for review in the Facilities Office during normal business hours.

The New York State Campus Security Act requires all higher education institutions in New York State to have a formal plan that provides for the investigation of missing students and violent felony offenders on campus. This requires written agreements between College authorities and local law enforcement agencies having local jurisdiction in the area(s) the College is located.

Daily Crime/Fire Log

A daily log of incidents that occur on Campus is kept and is available for the public to view in Facilities Office on all business days from 8:00 am-3:00 pm Monday -Friday or by request. The log includes date, time location and disposition of the incident.

Crime Prevention Programs

Crime prevention programs on personal safety and theft prevention are sponsored by Student Services throughout the year. Student Services staff facilitate programs for students providing a variety of strategies and tips on how to protect themselves from sexual assault, theft and other crimes. Security and safety related programs are also provided to students through presentations in Freshman Seminar.

The College educates the student community about sexual assaults and date rape through freshman orientation each fall. Classes and liturature on date rape education, risk reduction and college response are available through the Counseling Office.

Reporting a Crime

Victims and witnesses can report a crime on a voluntary and confidential basis.

All member of the College community are encouraged to report criminal activities. emergencies and suspicious activity in a timely manner. All reports are classified, logged and responded to appropriately. Crimes in progress and/or any other emergencies on campus can be reported by:

Activating a Blue Phone located on the the College grounds next to sidewalks and in parking lots.

Using A "Red" phone located in all building corridors.

Calling the Public Safety Office at 796-1344, or the Facilities Office at x2246, or by dialing 911.

In any kind of emergency try to have someone stay with you while another person is sent for help. In the event you contact medical or police authorities on your own, at the first opportunity, contact the Public Safety Office located on the first floor of the Residence Life building room 164 to report the incident and fill out an incident report. The report will be kept on file in the Public Safety Office.

When a SUNY Adirondack student is involved in an off campus offense, Public Safety may assist with the investigation in cooperation with local, stae or federal law enforcement. Local and state law enforcement agencies routinely work and communicate with Public Safety on any serius incidents occurring on or off campus.SUNY Adirondack operates no off-campus housing or off-campus student organization facilities. SUNY Adirondack Public Safety Officers have direst radio communication with local police, fire and ambulance services to facilitate a rapid response to emergency situations.

Counselors and Confidential Crime Reporting

As a result of the negotiated rulemaking rulemaking process which followed the signing into law, the 1998 amendments to 20 U.S.C. Section 1092(f), clarification was given to those considered to be campus authorities. Campus"Pastoral Counselors" and Campus "Professional Counselors", when acting as such, are not considered to be campus security authorities and are not required to report crimes for inclusion into the annual disclosure of crime statistics. As a matter of policy, they are encouraged, if and when the deem appropriate, to inform persons being counseled of the procedures to report crimes on a voluntary basis for inclusion into annual crime statistics.

The rule making committee defines counselors as:

Pastoral Counselor: An employee of an institution, who is associated with a religious order fo denomination, recognized by the religious order or denomination

someone who provides confidential counseling and who is functioning within the scope of that recognition as a pastoral counselor.

Professional Counselor: An employee of an institution whose official responsibilities include providing psychological counseling to members of the institutions community and who is functioning within the scope of his or her license or certification.

Campus Reporting Agents

These offices allow victims and witnesses to report crime on a voluntary, confidential basis and there is no formal investigationof an incident unless the victim so chooses.

Public Safety (non-emergency (518-796-1344 or ext. 2438

Dean of Student Affairs - Student Activities Office- Student Center (518)743-2251

Counseling Center Warren Hall Room WR 162 (518)743-2247

Residence Life & Housing Office (518)832-7785

Standard Access Policy

During business hours, the College is open to students, parents, employees, contractors, guests, and invitees. During non-business hours access to all college facilities is by card access, if authorized, or by admittance via the Public Safety.

Authorized College functions that take place during non business hours are scheduled through the Facilities Office and appropriate access to required facilities will be provided for.

Emergency Response

Crisis Response Team

The College's Leadership and Crisis Response Team are responsible for assessing emergency situations, appropriately responding to said emergencies and initiating necessary communication with those immediately impacted by the event.

The College maintains a Crisis Response Team to respond to campus emergencies. If a medical or criminal emergency arises that needs emergency response please use the following procedures to activate the Crisis Response Team and/or request response from the local authorities.

 

EMERGENCY RESPONSE PHONE NUMBERS

MEDICAL EMERGENCY:

  • Dial "0" for the College switchboard (this activates the Crisis Team)

or

  • Dial 796-1344 04 ext 2438 for Public Safety

or

  • Pick up the Red Phone () located in the building corridors or the Blue Phone () located in the outside walkways and parking areas and WAIT for a response

or

  • If deemed serious, from a Campus phone dial "9-911", or from your cell phone dial "911".
    • Now dial "743-2200" and then "0" for the College switchboard

 

DISRUPTIVE, VIOLENT OR CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR:

  • Dial "2438" from a College phone or"796-1344 for the Public Safety.

or

  • If deemed serious, from a Campus office phone dial "9-911", or from your cell phone dial "911". Now dial "2438" or "796-1344 for Public Safety.

or

  • Pick up the Red Phone () located in the building corridors or the Blue Phone () located in the outside walkways and parking areas and WAIT for a response

FIRE:

  • Dial "9-911" from a Campus office phone, or from your cell phone dial "911", now Dial "743-2200" and then "0" for the College switchboard (this activates the Crisis Team)

 

BOMB THREAT or CHEMICAL SPILL:

  • Dial ext. 2240 from a Campus office phone for the Director of Facilities or 743-2240 from your cell phone.

or

  • Dial ext 2438 from a College phone or 796-1344 for Public Safety

EVENINGS and WEEKEND EMERGENCIES:

  • Dial Ext. 2438 from a Campus office phone or 796-1344 from a cell phone for Security

 

Timely Notification

The College’s leadership is trained in assessing emergency situations, responding appropriately to emergencies, and initiating necessary communication with those immediately impacted by the event and the greater campus community.

The Director of Facilities and Public Safety and the Office of Public Safety in consultation with College leadership is responsible for determining the level of an incident. If there were a serious, immediate threat to the health and safety of the campus community, the emergency response protocol would be enacted as appropriate to the incident. This can include activation of the NYAlert alert system and campus email notification. Notification to the greater campus community is coordinated between Public Safety and the Enrollment Management and Marketing Office pursuant to agreements with local law enforcement agencies and media outlets.

Subsequent to the emergency response and for other non-imminent serious incidents, a Timely Notification would be prepared and distributed to campus e-mail, internal CCTV system, building main entrances and bulletin boards. Such notifications shall be prepared and distributed within two hours of said determination. Standard notification procedures may be altered if, in the emergency response authorities determine it would compromise efforts to assist a victim, or compromise efforts to contain, respond to or otherwise mitigate the emergency.

Note that SUNY Adirondack tests its entire emergency notification system once times per year and fire alarms three times per year. Pursuant to its procedures, fire drills are not announced, and testing of the other emergency systems may or may not be announced.

Evacuation

If the immediate evacuation of a building(s) is required, alarm notification (fire alarm system) will be activated. This evacuation procedure is tested three times a year. Communication is provided through Public Safety and Facilities staff who are assigned to each building. Public Safety and Facilities staff are trained on an annual basis in regards to evacuation procedures. Employees and students should familiarize themselves with the emergency evacuation routes posted in the buildings.

First Aid

The college does not have a nurse's office or other on campus medical services office. Medical emergencies are directed to the Glens Falls Hospital for attention. The college does provide first aid supplies and defibrillators located in various areas on campus. First Aid kits can be found in the following locations:

LOCATION OF EMERGENCY SUPPLIES

FIRST AID KITS

Dearlove Hall   Faculty Secretary's Area (Lower Level)
Eisenhart Hall   Faculty Secretary's Area (Lower Level)
Gym   Equipment Manager's Office (Lower Level)
Residence Life Building   Residence Life Offices
Science Building   Laboratories
    Faculty Secretary's area
Scoville   Library (Main Level)
    Scoville Cafe (Main Level)
    Student Computing (Lower Level)
Security   Vehicle
Student Center   Kitchen (Lower Level)
    Student Center Office (Main Level)
Warren Hall   Facilities Office (Lower Level)
    Upward Bound Office (Lower Level)
    VP for Administrative Services & Treasurer's Office
Washington Hall   Faculty Secretary's Area (Main Level)
    Switchboard/Mail Room (Lower Level)
Wilton Center   Administrator's Office

DEFIBRILLATORS

Dearlove Hall   Main Floor Corridor
Gymnasium   Director of Athletics Office (Lower Level) - Main Floor Lobby
Residence Life Building   Outside Fitness Center 1st Floor
Security   Security Vehicle
Student Center   Bookstore (Main Level)
Warren Hall   Corridor Main Floor
Washington Hall   Main Floor Corridor
Regional Higher Ed Center   Corridor
Scoville   Outside Library
Eisenhart Hall   Main Corridor
Science Building   Main Corridor
Wilton Center   Corridor

Crime Reporting

All members of the campus community are urged to report criminal incidents and emergencies that occur on campus. The institution does not at this time have any non-campus organizations.

The Director of Facilities and Public Safety is responsible for the collection of crime reports from campus authorities and local police for inclusion in the annual report.

In any kind of emergency, please try to have someone stay with you while another person is sent to get help. In the event you contact medical or police authorities on your own when no one is available to assist you, at the first opportunity please stop by the Public Safety Office located on the 1st floor of the Residence Life building Room 164 to report the incident and to fill out an incident report. The report will be kept on file in the Public Safety Office.

Public Safety   796-1344
Facilities Office   743-2246 or Ext. 2246
Warren County Sheriff's Office   911

Please be aware that the College allows victims and witnesses to report crime on a voluntary and confidential basis. Reports are filed for informational purposes to be used for inclusion in the college's crime reporting. Official investigations of criminal offenses are conducted by the proper local authorities.

CAMPUS CRIME STATISTICS

Campus Locations

Federal law requires that campuses report specific criminal activities that occur on campus property and specific areas around those properties. Crimes occur in the community beyond what is required to be reported in this document. Students are advised to exercise caution in ALL locations.

On Campus: includes all offenses reported on the main campus property and in campus buildings.

Non Campus: includes property owned or leased by the College outside campus boundaries. These properties include the Wilton Center located at 696 State Rt. 9, Wilton NY. and Crockwell Pond located on East Sanford Street in the City of Glens Falls.

Public Property: includes thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, parking facilities, and public parks or park-like settings immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.

Campus Incidents

A daily log of incidents that occur on campus is kept and is available for the public to view in the Facilities Office from 8am – 3:30pm Monday thru Friday or by request. This log includes the date, time, general location and disposition of the complaint.
In accordance with the Campus Safety Act, the following reflects reportable crime statistics at SUNY Adirondack for the previous (3) years. Statistics are compiled in the Facilities Office.

Crime Location 2010 2011 2012
Murder

On Campus
Non-Campus Property

On Public Property

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Manslaughter On Campus
Non-Campus Property
On Public Property
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Sex Offenses On Campus
Non-Campus Property
On Public Property
1
0
0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Robbery On Campus
Non-Campus Property
On Public Property
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Aggravated Assault On Campus
Non-Campus Property
On Public Property
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Burglary On Campus
Non-Campus Property
On Public Property
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Arson On Campus
Non-Campus Property
On Public Property
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Motor Vehicle Theft On Campus
Non-Campus Property
On Public Property
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Liquor Law Violations On Campus
Non-Campus Property
On Public Property
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Drug Related Violations On Campus
Non-Campus Property
On Public Property
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Weapons Possesion On Campus
Non-Campus Property
On Public Property
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
         
Referrals Location 2010 2011 2012
Liquor Law Violations On Campus
Non-Campus Property
On Public Property
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Drug Related Violations On Campus
Non-Campus Property
On Public Property
0

0

0
0
0
0
0
0
Weapons Possession On Campus
Non-Campus Property
On Public Property
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Hate Crimes

During the 2009 – 2012 reporting years SUNY Adirondack had no hate crimes reported.

DEFINITIONS OF THE ABOVE CRIMINAL ACTIONS

Murder - the willful killing of one human being by another.

Forcible Sex - any sexual act directed against another person, forcibly and/or against that person's will, or where the victim is incapable of giving consent, and includes forcible rape, forcible sodomy, sexual assault with an object, and forcible fondling.

Non-forcible Sex - acts of unlawful, non-forcible sexual intercourse including incest and statutory rape. Depending on the circumstances, acquaintance rape could be in either category.

Robbery - the taking, or attempting to take, anything of value under confrontational circumstances from the control, custody, or care of another person or persons by force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear of immediate harm.

Arson - Any willful or malicious burning, attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another etc.

Aggravated Assault - an unlawful attack by one person upon another wherein the offender displays or uses a weapon in a threatening manner, or the victim suffers obvious severe or aggravated bodily injury involving apparent broken bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severe laceration, or loss of consciousness.

Burglary - the unlawful entry into a building or other structure with the intent to commit a felony or a theft.

Motor Vehicle Theft - the theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle.

Liquor Law Violations - violations of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession or use of alcoholic beverages.

Drug Abuse Violations - violations of laws prohibiting the production, distribution, and/or use of certain controlled substances and the equipment or devices utilized in their preparation and/or use

Weapons Possessions - violations of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, concealment, or use of firearms, cutting instruments, explosives, incendiary devices, or other deadly weapons.

Hate Crime - when a person is victimized intentionally because of her/his actual or perceived race, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity or disability.

Crime Prevention Programs

Crime Prevention programs on personal safety and theft prevention are sponsored by Student Services throughout the year. Student Services staff facilitate programs for students providing a variety of strategies and tips on how to protect themselves from sexual assault, theft and other crimes. Security and safety related programs are also provided to students through presentations in Freshman Seminar classes.

 

BIAS CRIMES PREVENTION

Hate Crimes and the Law

It is a SUNY Adirondack mandate to protect all members of the campus community by preventing and prosecuting bias or hate crimes that occur within the campus’ jurisdiction.

Hate crimes, also called bias crimes or bias-related crimes, are criminal activity motivated by the perpetrator’s bias or attitude against an individual victim or group based on perceived or actual personal characteristics, such as their race, religion, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, or disability.  Hate/bias crimes have received renewed attention in recent years, particularly since the passage of the federal Hate/Bias Crime Reporting Act of 1990 and the New York State Hate Crimes Act of 2000 (Penal Law Article 485).  Copies of the New York law are available from the Office of the Dean for Student Affairs. 

Penalties for bias-related crimes are very serious and range from fines to imprisonment for lengthy periods, depending on the nature of the underlying criminal offense, the use of violence, or previous convictions of the offender.  Perpetrators who are students will also be subject to campus disciplinary procedures where sanctions including dismissal are possible.

In addition to preventing and prosecuting hate/bias crimes, SUNY Adirondack also assists in addressing bias-related activities that do not rise to the level of a crime.  These activities, referred to as bias incidents and defined by SUNY Adirondack as acts of bigotry, harassment, or intimidation directed at a member or group within the SUNY Adirondack community based on national origin, ethnicity, race, age, religion, gender, sexual orientation, disability, veteran status, color, creed, or marital status, may be addressed through the State University’s Discrimination Complaint Procedure or the campus Code of Conduct.  Bias incidents can be reported to the Dean for Student Affairs or the Director of Human Resources. 

If you are a victim of, or witness to a hate/bias crime on campus report it to Campus Security personnel by calling 796-1344 or using a Blue Light phone.  You can also contact the Dean for Student Affairs.  Designated college personnel will investigate and follow the appropriate adjudication procedures. 

Victims of bias crime or bias incidents can avail themselves of counseling and support services from the campus by contacting the Counseling Office at 743-2278, or stopping by the Office, located in Warren Hall. 

For general information on SUNY Adirondack security procedures contact the Office of Facilities at 743-2246.  Further information about bias-related and bias crimes, including up-to-date statistics on bias crimes is available from Office of the Dean for Student Affairs at 832-7708.

Missing Persons Policy

SUNY Adirondack provides on-campus residential students with the opportunity to register a confidential missing person contact through the office of Residence Life during the move in/resident orientation process.  Contact information is kept confidential only to be accessed by authorized campus officials and not disclosed except to law enforcement in cases of missing person reports.

 

If a faculty/staff member, student or parent believes a student is missing they should contact one of these offices:

  • Campus Safety (518) 796-1344
  • Residence Life (518) 832-7785
  • Dean for Student Affairs (518) 832-7708

Please be prepared to provide a description of the person, if possible, a photo, their local address, length of time missing and any other pertinent information

SUNY Adirondack will, within 24 hours of receiving a report of any missing student, take certain steps to locate students reported missing for 24 hours.  These steps include, but are not limited to:

  • Attempting to reach student via phone, twitter, facebook, social media or other means of electronic communication
  • Contact friends, teachers and acquaintances for any additional information that might help located missing person
  • Conduct a search, coordinated by Campus Safety on campus
  • If search is unsuccessful the college may, on a case by case basis, determine to prepare a statement to be distributed to the local media

Reports of students determined to be missing will immediately be shared with Campus Safety and then, within 24 hours, contact the local law enforcement.

SUNY Adirondack will contact the confidential contact person designated by residential students within 24 hours of the student being reported missing if student is not found.  If a student is under the age of 18 the College will contact the parent or guardian, as well as the confidential contact, if the student reported missing is not found within 24 hours.

Sexual Assault and Stalking

Most sexual assaults are not committed by sociopathic strangers hiding in the shadows. College students are actually in far greater danger of being sexually assaulted by a friend or a fellow student than by a stranger. With its high number of dating and social activities, the campus setting can offer opportunities for date rape to occur.

When a victim's relationship with the offender or the circumstances that are involved make a victim hesitant to report a sexual crime, the term "date rape" or "acquaintance rape" is frequently used. Sometimes the offender is a date or a friend. Sometimes alcohol or drug consumption or sexual play past a mutually agreed upon point is forced upon a partner.

Just as victims have been mistaken about feeling responsible for being attacked, perpetrators have tended to deny their guilt and responsibility. An otherwise reasonable person may suggest that it is all right to pressure or force someone to have sex if:

  • He/she paid for a dinner or a night out, especially if the evening was expensive.
  • The victim changed his/her mind.
  • They have had sex before.
  • There was flirtatious behavior.
  • The situation was a result of a bar pick-up or other pick-up situation.

These, however, never excuse inappropriate behavior. There is one single principle to remember: when any form of sex is against a person's will, it is against the law. If you have any doubts about what your partner wants, stop and ask.

  • It is never okay to force yourself on another person.
  • Sex is never owed or due to someone.
  • If you have any doubts about what your partner wants, stop and ask.

AVOIDING SEXUAL ASSAULT & STALKING

There are a number of precautions that anyone can take to reduce the risk of being victimized:

  • Travel with friends whenever possible.
  • Walk directly and with purpose.
  • Plan your route in advance. Use only well-lit areas.
  • When leaving school or working late, leave with a group. Never be the last one out alone.
  • Travel in comfortable walking shoes and clothing.
  • Carry a pocketbook only if absolutely necessary, but protect valuables.
  • Do not respond to advances from strangers or communicate with them in any way.
  • If being followed, do not go home. Go to a police station or nearest public place.
  • Service your car regularly to avoid breakdowns.
  • Keep your car locked while riding or parked.
  • Park in well-lit areas.
  • When approaching your car, begin checking from a distance under the car, nearby hiding places, etc.
  • Have your keys ready.
  • Check the backseat.
  • Report suspicious activity to the school and/or police.
  • Be realistic about your ability to protect yourself. An immediate reaction of yelling, hitting, or biting may give you a chance to escape, but it may also lead to further harm.
  • If your life is in danger, passive resistance (vomiting, urinating, telling the attacker you're diseased or menstruating) may be your best defense.

Campus Disciplinary Proceeding Involving Sexual Assault

In cases of sexual assault, both the accuser and the accused are entitled to the same opportunities to have others present during a disciplinary proceeding. Both the accuser and the accused shall be informed of any institutional disciplinary proceeding alleging a sex offense. Both the accused and the accuser will be provided with the outcome of any disciplinary action taken.

 

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE INFORMATION

Partner violence happens everywhere to women and men of all ages, income levels, and backgrounds. Research has found that:

  • Partner violence is the leading cause of injury to women ages 15-44 in the United States.
  • Most abusers are male, and most victims of partner violence are female. However, partner violence also occurs in same-sex relationships, and women can be abusers too.
  • Women ages 16-24 are the most likely to experience partner violence.

What to Do If You Are Experiencing Partner Violence

If you are experiencing partner violence, the following actions can help make you safer:

  • If you are in immediate danger and are able, call 911.
  • Consider leaving the relationship. Abuse usually gets worse, and you deserve to be safe.
  • Talk to someone you trust such as clergy, other family members, social workers, your doctor or good friends about what is going on. Campus Safety can help too.
  • Keep a crisis line phone number on hand in the event you have to leave in a hurry. Keep a fully charged cell phone on you at all times so you'll be able to make emergency calls.
  • Establish a secret emergency phrase or word that will tell friends and family to call the police
  • Leave an "emergency kit" with someone you trust such as a friend or another family member. The kit should include money, important telephone numbers, important papers, and other items you would need in the event you would have to leave in a hurry.

 

Partner Violence Red Flags

While these can be useful, each situation is different and there is no foolproof way to predict or recognize abuse. Trust your instincts.

  • Quick Involvement - Abusive relationships are often intense and quick to form.
  • Jealousy and Isolation - Abusive partners often begin the cycle of abuse by isolating their partner from friends, family, and anyone else who might challenge their abusive behavior.
  • Anger and Violence - Abusive partners often show explosive anger or violent behavior before directing it at their partner.
  • Unpredictable Behavior - Abusive partners may switch moods quickly. This is one way to establish control over a fearful partner.
  • Belief in Personal Superiority/Sexist Thinking - For example, many abusive men in heterosexual relationships believe that men should control women, that women should be kept “in their place,” etc.
  • Abusive Behavior - Once a relationship has been established, abusers gradually introduce a range of abusive actions, such as hitting, kicking, slapping, pushing, embarrassing their partner, intimidating their partner and forcing their partner to do things they don’t want to. These behaviors can escalate into threatening to harm family/friends/pets, isolating their partner and blaming their partner for the abuse. Abuse tends to become more extreme and violent over time.

Remember: No one deserves to be abused! Perpetrators are responsible for their own actions. Survivors are never to blame.

Helping A Friend

Someone in an abusive relationship may have a very tough time leaving. By being a good friend and offering your support, you can make it a little easier.

  • Help your friend recognize the abuse. Tell your friend you are worried about them.
  • Help them find counseling and other resources. Contact the Counseling Center at 743-2278 for appropriate resources.
  • Don’t threaten to break off your friendship. This will only isolate your friend further, and make it harder for them to leave.

Get professional help. Ask a counselor for the best ways to help your friend.

 

VICTIMS OF ASSAULT: IMMEDIATE NEEDS

After an attack, the victim should try to be as calm as possible. Getting to a safe place and calling for help promptly is extremely important. Call the police, a friend, or a rape crisis service. Leave the crime scene exactly as it is, not touching anything, cleaning up, or throwing anything away.

Do not change, wash, or destroy any clothing or wash any part of your body. Women should not douche. If the attack occurs on campus, immediately contact the Dean for Student Affairs or the Director of Facilities. It's important to receive medical aid promptly. Not only can internal and external injuries be treated, but measures can also be taken to combat the possibilities of disease. This is also an opportunity to collect evidence.

As soon as possible, write down every detail about the incident.

  • Who, what, where, and how.
  • What the rapist looked like.
  • The make and model of the vehicle.
  • What kind of force or coercion was used.
  • Any objects touched, taken, or left by the rapist.
  • If the rapist said anything, try to remember the words, the grammar, any accents, or speech defects.
  • If there were witnesses, obtain names and addresses, if possible.

A victim should seek professional help and not try to deal with rape alone. Several numbers to call are available through the Counseling Office.

COUNSELING AND SUPPORT SERVICES

We at SUNY Adirondack are concerned for each and every student's safety and security. Please contact the Counseling Office for a listing of community agencies.

REMEMBER: Every emergency situation is different. Only you can decide which course of action is appropriate.

Sex Offender Registration

In Accordance with the "campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act" of 2000, which amends the Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Registration Act, The Jeanne Clery Act and Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, the Campus Safety Department of SUNY Adirondack is providing a Link to the New York State Sex Offender Registry. This act requires institutions of higher education to issue a statement advising the campus community where law enforcement information provided by a State concerning registered sex offenders may be obtained. It also requires sex offenders already required to register in a State to provide notice to each institution of higher education in that State at which the person is employed, carries a vocation, or is a student. In the State of New York, convicted sex offenders must register with the New York State Department of Criminal Justice Services.

The Sex Offender Registry is available via Internet. Registry information is provided is to be used for the purposes of the administration of criminal justice, screening of current or prospective employees, volunteers or otherwise for the protection of the public in general and children in particular. Unlawful use of information for purposes of intimidating or harassing another is prohibited and willful violation shall be punishable as a Class 1 misdemeanor.

Follow the link below to access the Registry web site.

http://criminaljustice.state.ny.us/nsor/

 

SEXUAL ASSAULT AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE LAWS

SEXUAL ASSAULT & THE LAW

Sexual assault is nonconsensual physical contact of a sexual nature. Sexual assault of others is prohibited by campus regulation and by New York State penal law. New York State Law contains the following legal provisions defining the crimes related to sexual assault:

Section 130.20 – Sexual Misconduct. This offense includes sexual intercourse without consent and deviate sexual intercourse without consent. The penalty for violation of this section could result in imprisonment for a period of up to 1 year.

Section 130.25/.30/.35 – Rape. This series of offenses includes sexual intercourse with a person incapable of consent because of the use of forcible compulsion or because the person is incapable of consent due to being mentally disabled, mentally incapacitated, or physically helpless. This series of offenses further includes sexual intercourse with a person under the age of consent. The penalties for violation of these sections could result in imprisonment for a period of up to 25 years.

Section 130.40/.45/.50 – Criminal Sexual Act. This series of offenses includes oral or anal sexual conduct with a person incapable of consent because of the use of forcible compulsion or because the person is incapable of consent due to being mentally disabled, mentally incapacitated, or physically helpless. This series of offenses further includes oral or anal sexual conduct with a person under the age of consent. The penalties for violation of these sections could result in imprisonment for a period of up to 25 years.

Section 130.52 – Forcible Touching. This offense involves the forcible touching of the sexual or other intimate parts of another person for the purpose of degrading or abusing such person; or for the purpose of gratifying the actor’s sexual desire. Forcible touching includes the squeezing, grabbing, or pinching of such other person’s sexual or other intimate parts. The penalty for violation of this section could result in imprisonment for a period of up to 1 year.

Section 130.55/.60/.65 – Sexual Abuse. This series of offenses includes sexual contact with a person by forcible compulsion, or with a person who is incapable of consent due being physically helpless, or due to the person being under the age of consent. The penalties for violation of these sections could result in imprisonment for a period of up to 7 years.

Section 130.65-a/.66/.67/.70 – Aggravated Sexual Abuse. This series of offenses occurs when a person inserts a finger or a foreign object in the vagina, urethra, penis or rectum of another person by forcible compulsion, when the other person is incapable of consent by reason of being mentally disabled, mentally incapacitated, or physically helpless, or when the other person is under the age of consent. The level of this offense is enhanced if the insertion of a finger or foreign object causes injury to the other person. The penalties for the violation of these sections could result in imprisonment for a period of up to 25 years.

Section 130.90– Facilitating a sex offense with a controlled substance. This offense includes knowingly and unlawfully possessing a controlled substance or any preparation, compound, mixture or substance that requires a prescription to obtain and administers such substance to another person without such person’s consent. The penalties for the violation of this section could result in imprisonment for a period of up to 7 years.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, STALKING AND THE LAW

Domestic violence, dating violence, relationship violence, and intimate partner violence, is a pattern of abusive behavior (physical, sexual, emotional, and psychological) that is used by one person to gain power and control over a current or former dating partner or intimate partner or current or former spouse, including gay or lesbian relationships.

Stalking is defined as a pattern of conduct involving repeated or continuing harassment that is intended to cause or does cause a person to fear or suffer: (1) Death or death of others important to that person; (2) Assault or assault of others important to that person; (3) Bodily injury or bodily injury of others important to that person; (4) Sexual assault or sexual assault of others important to that person; (5) Involuntary restraint or involuntary restraint of others important to that person; (6) Damage to property or damage to property of others important to that person; (7) Confinement or confinement of others important to that person, (8) Threats of harassment via electronic devices (e.g. e-mail, phone, fax). Stalking can involve a range of behaviors including, but not limited to, following someone on foot or in a car, showing up at the victim’s place of work, repeatedly calling, sending flowers and gifts, contact through emails and letters, breaking into the victim’s home, and even homicide. The relationship between the perpetrator and the victim may be a current or former dating partner or spouse, married, or living together, including gay and lesbian relationships, acquaintances, or strangers.  Domestic violence and stalking is prohibited by campus regulation and by New York State penal law.

 

DRUG-FREE CAMPUS POLICY
(Alcohol and Controlled Substances)

A. Statement of Purpose

SUNY Adirondack has a vital interest in insuring safe, healthful, and efficient conditions for all students, faculty, and staff and in helping each to become optimally contributing members of society. In addition, as a federal contractor (or grantee), it has a duty to safely and efficiently provide the public with quality education. The unlawful presence of controlled substances on the campus conflicts with these vital interests and constitutes a violation of the public trust. For these reasons, the College has established, as a condition of one's enrollment and continued enrollment, the following drug-free campus policy.

II. Standards of Conduct Prohibiting Illicit Drug and Alcohol Abuse

A. Prohibition Against Unlawful Presence of Illicit Drugs and Alcohol On-Campus
The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession or use of illicit drugs or alcohol on College premises or while engaged in College activities is strictly prohibited.

B. College Sanctions for Violation of Drug-Free Campus Policy
Any student who violates the foregoing drug-free campus policy shall, subject to provisions of the College's Code of Conduct found in the Student Handbook, be subject to disciplinary procedures consistent with applicable laws, rules and regulations. These sanctions may include expulsion, termination of on-campus employment, referral for prosecution, or participation in an approved drug or alcohol assistance program.

C. College's Code of Conduct
A student enrolling at SUNY Adirondack assumes an obligation to conduct oneself in a manner compatible with the functions of the College as an educational institution. All conduct which adversely affects the student's suitability as a member of the academic community shall result in appropriate disciplinary action. (See Code of Conduct)

D. Statement on Public Order
The College is a public institution operated for the purpose of providing educational opportunities to students and to support cultural and intellectual aspects of the area. College students, faculty, staff, employees and visitors to the campus are required to conduct themselves in accordance with the law and with College rules and regulations at all times.

The College rules and regulations prohibit, among other things, any action or situation which recklessly or intentionally endangers mental or physical health or involves the forced consumption of alcohol or drugs for the purpose of initiation into or affiliation with any organization. Such rules and regulations shall be deemed to be part of the by-laws of all organizations operated on campus which shall review annually such by-laws with individuals affiliated with such organizations. In addition to the penalties outlined below for individuals, an organization which authorizes such conduct will be subject to the revision of permission for the organization to operate on campus property and to continue as a sanctioned organization.

E. Statement on College's Cooperation with Law Enforcement Officials
The College will cooperate fully and completely with local or state authorities on any case of suspected use, possession or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol. In the event that any student is apprehended by local, state or federal authorities for the offense of use, possession or distribution of illicit drugs or alcohol, that student will not be in any way protected by the College. A student convicted of violating civil law may be subject to separation from the College.

III. Health Risks Associated with Illicit Drug and Alcohol

In order to be informed citizens, we all need to be aware of the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and alcohol abuse. The following is a brief summary of some of the health hazards caused by the use of:

Alcohol

Alcohol consumption causes a number of marked changes in behavior. Even low doses can significantly impair the judgment and coordination required to drive a car safely, increasing the likelihood that the driver will be involved in an accident. Low to moderate doses of alcohol also increase the incidence of a variety of aggressive acts, including spousal and child abuse. Moderate to high doses of alcohol cause marked impairments in higher mental functions, severely altering a person's ability to learn and remember information. Very high doses cause respiratory depression and death. If combined with other depressants of the central nervous system, much lower doses of alcohol will produce the effects just described.

Repeated use of alcohol can lead to dependence. Sudden cessation of alcohol intake is likely to produce withdrawal symptoms, including severe anxiety, tremors, hallucinations, and convulsions. Alcohol withdrawal can be life-threatening. Long-term consumption of large quantities of alcohol, particularly when combined with poor nutrition, can also lead to permanent damage to vital organs such as the brain and the liver. Mothers who drink alcohol during pregnancy may give birth to infants with fetal alcohol syndrome. These infants have irreversible physical abnormalities and mental retardation. In addition, research indicates that children of alcoholic parents are at greater risk than other youngsters of becoming alcoholics.

Controlled Substances

There is overwhelming evidence that illegal drug use leads to academic failure, failure to get a job, failure to keep a job and maintenance of good health, as well as creating other problems.

IV. Legal Sanctions Imposed for Illicit Drug and Alcohol Abuse

Preventing the spread of unlawful possession, use and distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol is everyone's responsibility. If you wish to report illegal drug activity, you can make a toll-free call to: 1-800-GIVE-TIP. Calls will be received in complete confidence and will be referred to the appropriate Federal, State, or local authority. Considerations regarding a few of the state legal sanctions follow:

Articles 220 and 221 of the Penal Law are directly aimed at unlawful traffic in mind-affecting drugs. They are compatible with the Public Health Law and the provisions of the latter are often cross-referenced in the Penal Law sections that deal with the different drugs. Articles 220 and 221 set criminal penalties for possession or sale of drugs considered harmful or subject to abuse. The seriousness of the offense and penalty imposed upon conviction depend upon the individual drug and amount held or sold. Marijuana has been placed in Article 221 and separately dealt with in the Penal Law, as a result of the Marijuana Reform Act of 1977. That statute made the penalties upon conviction of use of small amounts of marijuana less severe than formerly. Specific sections of interest in Article 220 not included in the table follow:

Section 220.44 makes a sale of a controlled substance in or near school grounds, to a person less than 19 years of age, Class B felony. 220.45 makes criminal possession of a hypodermic instrument a Class A misdemeanor. 220.46 makes criminal injection of another person with a narcotic drug, with consent of that person, a Class E felony. 220.50 bans possession or sale of drug paraphernalia; deals with things that dilute drugs, like dextrose or mannite; and gelatin capsules, plastic envelopes, etc., considered commercial preparation materials (Class E felony). 220.60 makes criminal possession of certain "precursors" of controlled substances used in their preparation or manufacture but not the drugs themselves, a Class E felony (for example, ergot or diethylamide).

It is important to be aware, that under the Penal Law, a gift of drugs, including marijuana, is treated as a sale. New York State Penal Law defines a misdemeanor as a crime punishable by imprisonment for more than 15 days but not more than one year. A felony is a crime punishable by imprisonment for more than one year.

V. Assistance in Matters Related to Drug and Alcohol Abuse

SUNY Adirondack has a commitment to help students succeed academically, vocationally and socially. We can assist you with drug or alcohol related problems or can refer you to someone who can. Please see your advisor, a counselor or the Dean for Student Affairs if you wish to discuss a problem with drugs or alcohol. We can help you find assistance off-campus through individuals or agencies. Also, to help in maintaining an environment that does not permit the possession or use of illicit drugs and alcohol, SUNY Adirondack has established an awareness program to provide education for students, faculty and staff regarding the following aspects of the use of illicit drugs and alcohol: standards of conduct, disciplinary sanctions by the College, health risks, legal sanctions by local, state and federal laws and rehabilitation, counseling and re-entry. Such education may include (1) inclusion of this statement in the Student Handbook; (2) video tape and print materials made available to students in class, the Student Center and the Counseling Offices; (3) the distribution of lists of those agencies and individuals who can assist students in coping with drug and alcohol abuse problems.

This policy and program will be reviewed at least biennially by a representative committee of students and staff selected and chaired by the Dean for Student Affairs. The committee's purpose will be to determine the program's effectiveness and ensure that disciplinary sanctions are consistently enforced.